Monthly Archives: January 2012

High Heels, Health Risks, Bad Side Effects, & Muscle Stress

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High heels stress muscles, pose injury risk—and change the way future women will walk?

If, over the next millennia, women will continue to use high-heeled shoes as modern women do, women in the future may evolve a tottering gait, walking with shorter, more forceful strides than men, with their feet perpetually in a flexed, toes-pointed position.

The long-term consequences of walking this way are yet unknown but will certainly be far-reaching and profound—not unlike the significant outcomes of Australopithecus afarensis hominids beginning to walk upright rather than in a crouched position like their distant cousins, the apes.

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Gardasil for Men (vs. Anal Cancer & Genital Warts): Side Effects & Safety

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Gardasil for boys advised by US, Canada health authorities: Do you want to protect your son against genital warts? Or are you a sexually active male gay worried that you may get anal cancer?

If you are either, you might be glad to know that the use of Gardasil in males to protect against anal cancer, pre-cancerous lesions and genital warts was endorsed in January (2012) by Canada’s federally appointed panel of experts.

This follows the lead of its counterpart in the United States, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices that voted last fall to strongly recommend the use of HPV vaccines in boys and young men.

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Brown Fat: Obesity Cure or Weight-Loss Fad? Carpentier & Spiegelman Studies

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Can brown fat be used to ‘cure’ obesity? Or is it the new weight-loss buzzword, no less a fad than multivitamins and protein diets that end up causing more harm than good?

The answer to both questions is ‘maybe’ — based on the most current information scientists have at hand, including the results of two recent studies on brown fat.

Brown fat, the brown-colored fatty tissue found mainly in patches along the neck and between the shoulders of newborn mammals and in adults of hibernating animals, exists to warm the body.

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